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Monthly Archive for February 2011

2011 Ryukoku Lectures: The Hongwanji: Institutional and Doctrinal Developments in the Tokugawa Era

Thursday, February 17, 2011, 5:13 pm

The Institute of Buddhist Studies 2011 Ryūkoku Lectures

The History of the Shin Buddhist Tradition: significant persons, moments and issues

by Professor Atsushi Hirata
Department of History
Ryūkoku University, Kyoto, Japan

Professor Atsushi Hirata will deliver the 2011 Ryūkoku Lectures at the Institute of Buddhist Studies. The lectures will take place on the following dates at the Jodo Shinshu Center, 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704.

Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 2:10-5:00 pm
Buddhadharma and the feudal system

Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 2:10-5:00 pm
The Sangō Wakuran incident and its impact

Wednesday, March 16, 2011, 2:10-5:00 pm
Hongwanji and the State: the two truth theory

All of Professor Hirata’s lectures will be given in Japanese, with English translation. These lectures are open to public, without charge for admission. All interested persons are invited and encouraged to attend Prof. Hirata’s lectures.

Noboru and Yaeko Hanyu Buddhist Chaplaincy Professorial Chair

Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 12:16 pm

Noboru Hanyu

Noboru Hanyu, on January 26, 2011, established a $500,000.00 endowed professorial chair at the Institute of Buddhist Studies to honor his late wife Yaeko, who passed away on November 1, 2002. He attributes his life long association with the Buddhist Churches of America to the support of his loving wife.

“This chair is my way of expressing my appreciation to Yae for her support and will keep alive her spirit of dana for the Buddhist movement in America,” Hanyu said.

The IBS is a graduate seminary of Buddhist ministry, and Buddhist studies. The chair will be named the Noboru and Yaeko Hanyu Buddhist Chaplaincy Professorial Chair and will be gifted through Mr. Hanyu’s Living Trust. The IBS Endowment is part of the BCA 21st Century Campaign; therefore, the BCA Endowment Foundation will administer the assets of the fund. The IBS Dean’s office in consultation with the faculty and Board of Trustees will determine the use of the funds.

Hanyu, a long time member of the Buddhist Church of San Francisco, while being active at the temple has been taking many leadership roles in the Buddhist Churches of America. In 2009, he was awarded BCA Lifetime Service Award for his dedication to BCA for over 60 years.

His various positions with the BCA include President of the BCSF, President of the, BCA, Chair of the Sustaining Membership Program, Chair of the BCA Minister’s Pension Program, BCA Headquarters Administrative Officer, Treasurer of the Campaign for Buddhism in America, and Treasurer of the BCA Endowment Foundation from 1965 to 2008.

“On behalf of the IBS, I would like to express our heartfelt gratitude to Mr. Hanyu for his generous gift. Buddhist chaplaincy is a new development, one that allows the propagation of the Buddhist teaching in hospitals, and hospices, jails and prisons, in military and university settings. Chaplains are trained to serve anyone and everyone in need, no matter what the person’s religious affiliation. The purpose is to serve that individual, to make real the spirit of compassion that is the heart of the Buddha’s message.

“This is an important area of future growth for Buddhists in the United States today, and the support of the Noboru and Yaeko Hanyu Endowment will make it possible for IBS to train a new generation of Buddhist leaders, manifesting compassion in the most difficult of life situations, those of disease and death, punishment and servitude, loneliness and isolation,” stated Dr. Richard Payne, IBS Dean.

Photo credit: Seated Mr. Noboru Hanyu. Standing L to R: Dr. Richard Payne, Phung Kim Le, and Rev. Kengu Kobata. (Insert photo: Mr. and Mrs. Noboru and Yaeko Hanyu.)

International Conference on Other-Centered Approaches

February 18, 2011toFebruary 20, 2011

First International Conference on Other-Centered Approaches: New Directions in Buddhist Psychology

at the Jodo Shinshu Center
Berkeley, California

February 18 – 20, 2011

Please click here for complete details on this conference.

other center buddhist psychology conference flyer

Download this PDF flyer or click here for more information.

Ryukoku Lecture Series: The Hongwanji (1)

March 2, 2011
2:10 pmto5:00 pm

Click here for more details about this event.

The History of the Shin Buddhist Tradition: significant persons, moments and issues

by Professor Atsushi Hirata
Department of History
Ryūkoku University, Kyoto, Japan

Lecture One: Buddhadharma and the feudal system

Click here for more details about this event.

Ryukoku Lecture Series: The Hongwanji (2)

March 9, 2011
2:10 pmto5:00 pm

Click here for more details about this event.

The History of the Shin Buddhist Tradition: significant persons, moments and issues

by Professor Atsushi Hirata
Department of History
Ryūkoku University, Kyoto, Japan

Lecture Two: The Sangō Wakuran incident and its impact

Click here for more details about this event.

Ryukoku Lecture Series: The Hongwanji (3)

March 16, 2011
2:10 pmto5:00 pm

Click here for more details about this event.

The History of the Shin Buddhist Tradition: significant persons, moments and issues

by Professor Atsushi Hirata
Department of History
Ryūkoku University, Kyoto, Japan

Lecture Three: Hongwanji and the State: the two truth theory

Click here for more details about this event.

IBS Graduate Student Symposium

April 1, 2011
2:00 pmto5:00 pm

Please join us on Friday, April 1 from 2:00 – 5:00 pm, for the Institute of Buddhist Studies’ first annual Graduate Student Symposium.

This year’s symposium will be a four-person panel composed of IBS and GTU students who will present ongoing research on Buddhism’s interaction with the modern world. Presenter include:

  • Dianne Muller (DSPT): The Concepts of White Buddhism and Double Belonging in Contemporary America
  • Trent Thornley (IBS): Coming Out Buddha
  • Courtney Bruntz (GTU-PhD): Nanhai Guanyin and Notions of the Colossus
  • Anthony Rodgers (IBS): Investigating Western Applications of Buddhadharma

This is our first annual symposium, a new venture of the IBS designed to give graduate students an opportunity for professional development. Small panels and colloquia provide students with an excellent setting in which to share their work and get feedback from their peers. Please come and support your fellow IBS and GTU students!

A light reception will follow the panel.

Please contact Courtney Bruntz or Scott Mitchell for more information, and check our website for updates.

GTU Graduate Fair for Prospective Master’s Students

April 2, 2011
9:30 amto1:30 pm

Come to this event for prospective Master’s degree students (MA, MDiv, and others) to meet representatives from the member schools, centers, and affiliates of the GTU and explore your interests in depth during panel discussions with faculty and students (and over lunch). Find out about a range of degree programs and the many fields of study offered in this ecumenical, interreligious graduate school community in Berkeley. Saturday, April 2, 9:30am to 1:30pm at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, Refectory, 2451 Ridge Road, Berkeley. RSVP with the GTU Admissions Office, gtuadm@gtu.edu, 510/649-2460.

An IBS representative will be in attendance for student’s wishing to learn more about Buddhist Studies at the GTU!

Mindfulness Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

April 8, 2011
6:00 pmto7:30 pm

There is an increasing need to advance the field of the clinical use of mindfulness. While current popular forms such as Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction are excellent ways to introduce the concept and practice of mindfulness to the general public, they do not capture the depth of the theory and practice of mindfulness as presented in the original teachings by the
Buddha.

The following talk will show how classical mindfulness can be translated into clinical application that will not only facilitate the efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy but also provide specific strategies to treat symptoms of anxiety disorders that are not adequately addressed by CBT.

This talk will be delivered by Lobsang Rapgay, faculty researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, Psychiatry Department.

Dr. Rapgay specializes in clinical behavioral medicine with focus on the assessment and treatment of chronic psychophysiological disorders and psychiatric symptoms. He has extensive training in psychoanalytical psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral therapy, clinical hypnosis and clinical EEG and peripheral biofeedback. As a monk for over twenty years, he has studied Tibetan Buddhism extensively as well as the theory and practice of Tibetan medicine and practiced Tibetan medicine for several years.

This talk will be held at the Jodo Shinshu Center and is free and open to the public.

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