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Monthly Archive for December 2012

Dharma at Times of Need: The Interface of Chaplaincy and Ministry

May 3, 2013 3:00 pmtoMay 4, 2013 5:00 pm

Register online now!

buddhist prayer flags chaplain ministryFundamental to the teachings of Buddhism is a description of the human condition as one of suffering, frustration and disappointment. A deep understanding of this condition is the necessary step toward living with and through that actuality, especially when we are confronted by that actuality in its starkest terms — the death of a loved one, a terminal illness, loss of hope, anguish.

This two day symposium will explore the ways that engaging the insights of the Dharma can benefit people at the times of greatest suffering, frustration and disappointment, and the role of minister and chaplain in assisting others at and through those times of need.

Location: Jodo Shinshu Center, Berkeley, CA

Pre-registration is strongly recommended.

This symposium is jointly sponsored by the Institute of Buddhist Studies, Berkeley, and the Buddhist Ministry Initiative, Harvard Divinity School, Cambridge.

DHARMA AT TIMES OF NEED: THE INTERFACE OF CHAPLAINCY AND MINISTRY

Friday, May 3 and Saturday, May 4, 2013
All sesssions will be held in the Kodo (Lecture Hall), second floor at the Jodo Shinshu Center.

Click here to download a PDF of this schedule.

Session 1: Friday, 3:30 to 5:30

Cheryl Giles, Francis Greenwood Peabody Professor of the Practice in Pastoral Care and Counseling, Harvard Divinity School
“SELF RENEWAL THROUGH NATURAL EMPATHY: CARING FOR OURSELVES AND OTHERS”

Dawn Neal, Institute of Buddhist Studies
“OFFERING BUDDHIST PRACTICES OUTSIDE BUDDHISM: CONSIDERATIONS FOR TRAINING BUDDHIST CHAPLAINS”

Adrianne Vincent, Harvard Divinity School
“BUDDHIST HOSPITAL CHAPLAINCY, VIPASSANA MEDITATION, AND CARING FOR CANCER PATIENTS AND CAREGIVERS”

Kazuha Fujii, Ryukoku University
“PRACTICAL SHIN BUDDHIST STUDIES (JISSEN SHINSHŪGAKU 実践眞宗学): A STUDENT’S PERSPECTIVE”

Keynote Address: Friday, 6:00 to 7:00

Seigen Yamaoka, Professor of Shin Buddhist Studies, Institute of Buddhist Studies
“MAKING MINISTRY PRACTICAL: CHANGING ROLES IN JAPAN”

Session 2: Saturday, 9:00 to 11:00

Peter Yuichi Clark, American Baptist Seminary of the West, and UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital
“OFFERING RESPECTFUL CARE WHILE NAVIGATING MULTI-RACIAL AND MULTI- RELIGIOUS BOUNDARIES”

Hillary Collins-Gilpatrick, Harvard Divinity School
“EXPLORING BUDDHIST MINISTRY IN THE PULPIT AND IN 12-STEP GROUPS”

Matthew Hamasaki, Institute of Buddhist Studies
“MINISTERING TO DIVERSITY: THE JODO SHINSHU SANGHA IN AMERICA”

Margaret Lowe, Harvard Divinity School “BUDDHIST MINISTRIES IN THE CHURCH”

Session 3: Saturday, 1:00 to 3:00

Daijaku Kinst, Director, Chaplaincy Program, Institute of Buddhist Studies
“WHAT MAKES BUDDHIST CHAPLAINCY BUDDHIST?: DEVELOPING AN EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR BUDDHIST CHAPLAINS AND MINISTERS IN A MULTI-TRADITION AND INTERFAITH SETTING”

Bill Dearth, Institute of Buddhist Studies
“MINISTERING TO THE LGBT COMMUNITY IN BCA TEMPLES”

Chenxing Han, Institute of Buddhist Studies
“VOICES FROM THE TWO-THIRDS: YOUNG ADULT ASIAN AMERICANS ENGAGE WITH BUDDHISM”

Nancy Chu, Harvard Divinity School
“THE ROLE OF PAIN IN TRANSFORMATIVE RELIGIOUS PRACTICES”

Session 4: Saturday, 3:30 to 5:00

Trent Thornley, Institute of Buddhist Studies
“SKILL IN STORYTELLING: WHAT THE ARIYAPARIYESANA SUTTA (NOBLE SEARCH) OFFERS BUDDHIST CAREGIVERS”

Sarah Jabbour, Harvard Divinity School
“DHARMA IN DYING”

Richard K. Payne, Dean, and Yehan Numata Professor of Japanese Buddhist Studies, Institute of Buddhist Studies
“TO WHOM DOES KISA GOTAMI SPEAK?: A TALE OF THREE AUDIENCES”

This event is free and open to the public. Advanced registration is requested. Please register here.

3rd Annual Graduate Student Symposium: Buddhist Ritual, Buddhist Culture

April 13, 2013
1:00 pmto5:00 pm

The Institute of Buddhist Studies’ 3rd Annual Graduate Student Symposium

Generously co-sponsored by the Graduate Theological Union’s Asia Project
and The Numata Foundation

April 13, 2013, 1 pm – 5 pm

We are pleased to announce 3rd Annual Graduate Student Symposium at the Institute of Buddhist Studies. Our theme this year is “Buddhist Ritual, Buddhist Culture.” Buddhist ritual practices are shaped by their location and are affected by the ritual objects. How does the material world determine the ways that Buddhism is practiced? How do Buddhists use ritual objects? In turn, how does Buddhism shape these objects and transform the physical world? What is the impact, for example, on the physical world as a result of religious pilgrimage or tourism? How do Buddhists transform physical objects in the process of ritualization? This symposium will focus on these themes and will consider both historical and contemporary uses of material objects in Buddhist ritual, Buddhism’s impact on cultural materials, and the relationships between Buddhism and sacred objects.

The symposium will feature a keynote address by Prof. Justin McDaniel of the University of Pennsylvania. Prof. McDaniel’s talk is generously supported by the Numata Foundation.

The event will be held on Saturday, April 13, beginning at 1 pm, at the Jodo Shinshu Center in Berkeley, CA.

This event is free and open to the public. Please visit our Facebook event page to RSVP or drop a note in the comments below.

Keynote Address:

Architects of Buddhist Leisure
Justin McDaniel, University of Pennsylvania

The rise of Asian economies over the 20th and 21st centuries has not only brought market competition and political influence, but also the rise of a “leisure class.” Buddhism, usually described as an austere religion which condemns desire and promotes monasticism and denial, has not been the subject of the history of leisure. There has been little investigation of Buddhist pleasures or pastimes. However, Buddhist leisure activities, Buddhist tourism, and Buddhist material products are common parts of Asian culture. Indeed, some of the first tourist books and souvenir shops in Asia were marketed and owned by practicing Buddhists in Bangkok, Kyoto, and Singapore. Novels and coffee-table books about Buddhist tourists and pleasure-seekers have been popular in Thai, Chinese, and Japanese history. Buddhist monasteries across Asia are sites of playgrounds, sports-fields, and shopping bazaars. Over the past seventy years, Buddhist comic books, films, and soap-operas have flourished on Asian airwaves. Indeed, many of the ways Buddhist children first learn about their religion is not in the strict confines of a monastic training center, but through Buddhist leisure activities like singing songs, family trips, martial arts camps, and beauty contests.  These creative religious improvisations and public culture of Buddhism in Asia is often built on the idea that Buddhist practice and leisure activities go hand-in-hand.

This short talk focuses on the work of three architects of Buddhist public and leisure spaces in Nepal, Singapore, and Thailand and is designed to start a discussion about the very idea of Buddhist leisure space in modern Asia.

Justin McDaniel studies ghosts and manuscripts in Asia. After living and researching in South and Southeast Asia for many years as a translator, archivist, amulet collector, volunteer teacher, and Buddhist monk. He returned to the States and received his PhD from Harvard University’s Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies in 2003. His research foci include Lao, Thai, Pali and Sanskrit literature, Southeast Asian Buddhism, Japanese Buddhist architecture, ritual studies, manuscript studies, asceticism, the undead, and general phantasmagoria. His first book is on the history of Buddhist monastic education in Laos and Thailand, Gathering Leaves and Lifting Words (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2008). It won the Benda Prize from the Association of Asian Studies for the best first book in Southeast Asian Studies. His second book, The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical Monk (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011) is a study on material culture and ritual in Thai Buddhism. His recent publications appear in the Bulletin l’École Française d’Extrême-Orient (Études thématiques), Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies, Aséanie, Journal of Religion and Film, Material Religion, Manusya, Journal of Burma Studies, and the Journal of the Siam Society, as well as contributions to collected articles on Buddhism and Modernity, Pali literature, Palm-leaf Manuscript research, and liturgical studies. He is the co-editor of the journals Buddhism Compass and Journal of Lao Studies, and is the former Chair of the Southeast Asian Studies Council and the Thailand, Laos, Cambodia Studies Group of the Association of Asian Studies. He has won several teaching and advising awards. In collaboration with colleagues at Penn, UC Riverside, and in Thailand, he has designed two websites: The Thai Digital Monastery Project (tdm.sas.upenn.edu) and the Thai, Lao, Cambodia Studies Portal (tlc.sas.upenn.edu). His present project looks at the advent of Buddhist leisure (parks, museums, carnivals, film, comics, bird-watching, and collecting stuff) in Japan, Nepal, Thailand, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Laos. In 2012 he was named a Guggenheim Fellow and is the Chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

Schedule of Events:

1:00pm: Welcome
Scott Mitchell, Institute of Buddhist Studies
Moses Penumaka, Graduate Theological Union Asia Project

1:15pm: Presentation of Graduate Student Work, part 1

Ryan Anningson; Wilfrid Laurier University-University of Waterloo
“’There Hang the Jewels:’ The Motif of Jewels in Buddhist Narratives”

Matthew Milligan; The University of Texas-Austin
“Material Evidence for Donation as Ritual in the Epigraphic Habit of Early Indian Buddhists”

-Break-

2:00pm: Presentation of Graduate Student Work, part 2

Ying Chien Chen (Rev. Jian Ji); The Institute of Buddhist Studies
“DDM Ash Burial Ceremony – How Buddhism Influences Chinese Cremation Culture”

Tsun Nyen Yong (Rev. You Min); The Institute of Buddhist Studies
“Memorial Tablets in Contemporary Chinese Buddhist Ritual”

Aaron Proffitt; The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
“Dōhan’s 道範 (1178-1252) Himitsu nenbutsu shō 秘密念仏抄 and Tantric Pure Land in Medieval Japanese Buddhism”

Discussion and Questions

4:00pm: Keynote Address: Architects of Buddhist Leisure

Dr. Justin McDaniel; Associate Professor, Religious Studies, University of Pennsylvania

A light reception will follow.

IBS Winter Symposium: Tradition and Insight

February 28, 2013
1:00 pmto5:00 pm

Tradition and Insight: 2013 IBS Winter symposium

Tradition and Insight: Our Encounter with the Pure Land Way

Please join us for the 2013 Institute of Buddhist Studies Winter Symposium

An exploration of the roles that a received tradition and personal engagement play in our realization of the truth and meaning of Jodo Shinshu.

Keynote address by
Dr. Takamaro Shigaraki
Professor Emeritus, Ryukoku University

and presentations by
Dr. Michael Conway of the Eastern Buddhist Society
Rev. Henry Adams of Oxnard Buddhist Temple

Thursday, February 28, 2013, 1 to 5 p.m.

San Mateo Marriott Hotel
1770 South Amphlett Blvd.
San Mateo, CA 94402

A portion of the symposium will take place in Japanese with English translation.

Free of charge, open to all.

Sponsored by the George T. Aratani Endowment for the IBS Center for Contemporary Shin Buddhist Studies.

Winter Pacific Seminar: the Path of the Nembutsu

February 23, 2013
8:30 amto5:00 pm

The 2013 Winter Pacific Seminar will be held at the Los Angeles Hompa Hongwanji Buddhist Temple on February 23, 2013. This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Buddhist Education. Please visit this link for more information and registration.

 

Please download this flyer for more information.

Call for Papers: Pure Land Buddhism Conference

Monday, December 03, 2012, 3:22 pm

Call for papers:
The Pure Land in Buddhist Cultures: History, Image, Praxis, Thought

University of British Columbia | Friday, May 31 to Sunday, June 2, 2013

Abstracts due: February 1, 2013
Papers due: May 23, 2013

For more information, visit the conference website here.

Pure Land Buddhist traditions have been some of the largest and most influential in Buddhist history, and remain so to the present day. Moreover, the very idea of a purified, perfect land of a buddha echoes throughout Buddhist text and praxis. Most often, this buddha is “Immeasurable Light” or “Immeasurable Life,” who created a pure land far to the west of our own world. But there are many others. This conference aims to examine sectarian traditions of Pure Land Buddhism as well as the “pure land” within Buddhism generally. As this conference is jointly-sponsored by associations connected to Pure Land Buddhist traditions in two countries, it is a unique chance to approach pure land expansively, in terms of its long history, global reach, and diverse regional and trans-regional expressions–whether in or across what are today known as China, Korea, Vietnam, Japan, Canada, and so on. The hope is to increase knowledge and scholarly exchange about the multifaceted development of pure land in Buddhist cultures. Papers are welcome on any aspect of pure land, type of Pure Land Buddhism, any region or historical period, and from any methodological or disciplinary perspective.

Please see the conference website for more information.

Call for papers, Update: Proposal Deadline Extended

Monday, December 03, 2012, 9:31 am

Buddhist Ritual, Buddhist Culture

Update: Proposal Deadline Extended

The Institute of Buddhist Studies’ 3rd Annual Graduate Student Symposium

Keynote speaker Dr. Justin McDaniel
University of Pennsylvania

April 13th, 2013
Institute of Buddhist Studies
Berkeley, CA

Call for Papers

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for the 3rd Annual Graduate Student Symposium at the Institute of Buddhist Studies. Our theme this year is “Buddhist Ritual, Buddhist Culture.” Buddhist ritual practices are shaped by their location and are affected by the ritual objects. How does the material world determine the ways that Buddhism is practiced? How do Buddhists use ritual objects? In turn, how does Buddhism shape these objects and transform the physical world? What is the impact, for example, on the physical world as a result of religious pilgrimage or tourism? How do Buddhists transform physical objects in the process of ritualization? This symposium will focus on these themes and will consider both historical and contemporary uses of material objects in Buddhist ritual, Buddhism’s impact on cultural materials, and the relationships between Buddhism and sacred objects.

We invite graduate students to submit proposals considering one or more of these topics, either historically or contemporarily. Proposals should be no more than 200 words, and include the paper’s title and the author’s name, affiliation, and contact information. Please submit proposals to courtney.bruntz -at  - gmail no later than January 31, 2013.

Professor McDaniel’s keynote address is being generously supported by the Yehan Numata Foundation.

Important Dates:
Submission of Abstract: January 31, 2013
Notification of Proposal Result: February 15, 2013
Submission of Full Paper: April 1, 2013
Conference Event: April 13, 2013

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